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Fig. 15. When a doorway or window built of wood is placed against a brick wall, as indicated in Fig. 15, the junction of the two materials should be carefully flashed with copper. In this type of construction the brick work is built up as the building progresses but the molded wood doorway is not placed until sometime later. This necessitates a two piece flashing (cap and base.)

   Each sheet of the cap flashing is built in as the brick work progresses and each sheet laps outside the next lower sheet at least 2 inches. The cap flashing may be cut from one or more sheets, instead of several sheets as shown, by notching the upper edges and turning them into the brick work. In either case the lower edge of the flashing should be turned back on itself ½ inch for stiffness. After the wood work is in place and the base flashing set the cap flashing is turned down over the base flashing far enough to lap the base flashing at least 4 inches. For a detail of Section A-A and description of the method of placing this flashing see Fig. 17.

Fig. 16. A wood doorway against a stucco wall is shown in Fig. 16. In this case the wood trim of the doorway will be in place before the stucco or shingles are applied. The cap and base flashings may, therefore, be made in one piece or two, as desired. If the doorway has a segmental head as shown on the left-hand side two-piece construction only may be used, owing to the curved-shape doorway. The horizontal length of the sheet on the wall is also determined by the radius of the doorway head. Each sheet should lap outside the next lower at least 2 inches. In the doorway shown on the right-hand side of the illustration the flashing may be made in one sheet, if desired. For a detailed description of Section B-B and C-C and the method of setting see description of Figs. 18 and 19.

Fig. 17. A Section A-A through the cornice in Fig. 15 is shown in Fig. 17. The cap flashing is built in as the brick work progresses, the upper edge being first turned up ½ inch (although some prefer to turn it completely back on itself). The lower edge is also turned back on itself and later turned down over the base flashing. After the wood work is placed the base flashing is hooked over a brass edge-strip (described in detail in the text on page 54) and turned up on the wall. The cap flashing is then turned down over the base flashing so that it will lap the base flashing at least 4 inches.

Fig. 18. When the head of the doorway is curved as indicated by the left-hand side of Fig. 16, it is necessary to make the flashing in two pieces as shown in Fig. 18, instead of in one piece as shown in Fig. 19. The lap of the two pieces should be at least ½ inch well-soldered. The method of applying the brass edge-strip is more fully described in the text on page 54.

Fig. 19. If a wood doorway is set against a wood wall covered with stucco as shown in Fig. 16, the moldings will be in place before the stucco is applied. The flashing may be made in one piece instead of two as shown in Fig. 17 (except when the head is segmental). The flashing is first hooked over a brass edge-strip nailed or screwed to the face of the top molding (described in the text on page 54) and extended up on wall at least 4 inches. The lath is brought down outside and a little in front of the flashing but nailed above it and the stucco then applied. If the flashing is made in several sheets as shown in Fig. 16, each sheet of flashing should lap outside the next lower sheet at least 2 inches. The flashing may be made in one or more long sheets if desired, except where the doorway has a segmental head.

Fig. 20. If a wood or composition column-cap is exposed to the action of the elements, good practice demands that the upper surfaces of the exposed projecting parts of the cap be protected from dampness. To accomplish this the top is covered with copper in the manner shown in Fig. 20. The portion over the dowel is made separately and soldered to the flat portion and the edges of the flat part turned down over the edge of the column cap about ½ inch and secured by copper nails as shown at "B."

Fig. 21. At the place where the base of a wood column rests on or penetrates a composition roof laid over wood, provision should be made to make the junction water-tight by means of a copper flashing cap as shown in Fig. 21. This is made up in one unit by soldering the various parts together and placing it either over the dowel on top of the column below or over a projection raised on the deck for this purpose. The copper should extend out on the roof at least 6 inches and be set in the layers of felt in the usual manner for composition roofs as shown and described elsewhere. The upper column is then placed over this cap and rests on top of it. The sides of the column base should be made to clear the composition roof from ½ to 1 inch to prevent rot. The above method with slight variations is used for round wood columns as well as square columns.

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