Plywood Weight, OSB Weight & More • Plywood Weight Charts

Including Weights for MDF, MDO, and Particle Board

By Jack Gray, Roof Online Editor • Last updated October 8, 2022

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Table of Contents

Plywood weight, OSB weight, and the weight of other wood panels
Stacks of 4’ x 8’ softwood plywood panels, 15/32-inch thick. Each sheet weighs about 40 pounds, so each one of those stacks weighs almost a ton and a half.

What is Plywood Made of?

Plywood is composed of approximately 92% – 97% wood, with the remainder made up by primers, sealants, and adhesives such as phenol formaldehyde resin.

Other engineered wood panel types, such as particle board or OSB, contain a much higher percentage of adhesive resin, and since these resins are heavier than wood, these panels tend to be significantly heavier than plywood.

Plywood Weight Factors

Plywood weight is determined by the length, width, and thickness of the panel, as well as the wood species and the types and amounts of adhesives, primers, and sealants used to make the plywood. This goes for all other types of engineered wood panels as well.

Plywood, OSB, particle board, etc. is manufactured using adhesives, primers, and sealants. Some of these panel types require quite a bit more of these materials than other types. For instance, while plywood is typically 90% to 95% wood, OSB might only contain 80% wood.

Since adhesive resins and sealants are much heavier than wood, this means that wood products that use a lot of them will be heavier than wood products that use less of them. For instance, OSB tends to be around 20% to 25% heavier than softwood plywood, OSB’s main competitor in the construction industry.

Another factor in plywood weight is the wood species used to make the panel. Different wood species have naturally different densities, and this can make a big difference in the weight of the finished product.

The use of different wood species and different proportions of adhesive by different manufacturers can result in weight differences of up to 20% for plywood or OSB panels with the exact same dimensions and product description from one manufacturer to the next, or even for different batches of the same product from the same manufacturer.

About Our Plywood Weight Charts

The following tables provide typical weights (dead load, self-weight) for plywood, OSB, and other engineered wood panels.

We provide metric and US standard plywood weights for whole standard sheets of various common thicknesses, as well as plywood weights per square foot, and plywood weights per square meter.

The plywood weights we give were calculated using the product data sheets or manufacturer specifications of actual, specific wood panel products, and in most cases our plywood weights are the average of product weights from more than one manufacturer.

Table 1: Plywood Weights in Pounds per Square Foot

Weight of Plywood, OSB, and Other Engineered Wood Panels
in Pounds per Square Foot (lb/ft²)
Panel Type Panel Thickness in Inches
1/4″ 11/32″ 3/8″ 15/32″ 1/2″ 19/32″ 5/8″ 23/32″ 3/4″ 7/8″ 1″ 1⅛”
APA Plywood
Standard
0.80
lb/ft²
1.00
lb/ft²
1.10
lb/ft²
1.40
lb/ft²
1.50
lb/ft²
1.70
lb/ft²
1.80
lb/ft²
2.10
lb/ft²
2.20
lb/ft²
2.60
lb/ft²
3.00
lb/ft²
3.30
lb/ft²
Baltic Birch
Plywood
0.92
lb/ft²
1.15
lb/ft²
1.26
lb/ft²
1.61
lb/ft²
1.72
lb/ft²
1.95
lb/ft²
2.06
lb/ft²
2.41
lb/ft²
2.54
lb/ft²
2.98
lb/ft²
3.44
lb/ft²
3.78
lb/ft²
Hardwood
Plywood
0.80
lb/ft²
1.00
lb/ft²
1.10
lb/ft²
1.40
lb/ft²
1.50
lb/ft²
1.70
lb/ft²
1.80
lb/ft²
2.10
lb/ft²
2.20
lb/ft²
2.60
lb/ft²
3.00
lb/ft²
3.30
lb/ft²
Marine
Plywood
0.85
lb/ft²
1.06
lb/ft²
1.17
lb/ft²
1.49
lb/ft²
1.60
lb/ft²
1.81
lb/ft²
1.92
lb/ft²
2.23
lb/ft²
2.34
lb/ft²
2.77
lb/ft²
3.19
lb/ft²
3.51
lb/ft²
Pressure-Treated
Plywood
1.00
lb/ft²
1.25
lb/ft²
1.37
lb/ft²
1.75
lb/ft²
1.87
lb/ft²
2.12
lb/ft²
2.24
lb/ft²
2.62
lb/ft²
2.74
lb/ft²
3.24
lb/ft²
3.74
lb/ft²
4.11
lb/ft²
Softwood
Plywood
0.72
lb/ft²
0.90
lb/ft²
0.99
lb/ft²
1.26
lb/ft²
1.35
lb/ft²
1.53
lb/ft²
1.62
lb/ft²
1.89
lb/ft²
1.98
lb/ft²
2.34
lb/ft²
2.70
lb/ft²
2.97
lb/ft²
MDF 1.15
lb/ft²
1.44
lb/ft²
1.58
lb/ft²
2.01
lb/ft²
2.16
lb/ft²
2.44
lb/ft²
2.59
lb/ft²
3.02
lb/ft²
3.16
lb/ft²
3.74
lb/ft²
4.31
lb/ft²
4.74
lb/ft²
MDO 0.80
lb/ft²
1.00
lb/ft²
1.10
lb/ft²
1.40
lb/ft²
1.50
lb/ft²
1.70
lb/ft²
1.80
lb/ft²
2.10
lb/ft²
2.20
lb/ft²
2.60
lb/ft²
3.00
lb/ft²
3.30
lb/ft²
Particle Board 1.08
lb/ft²
1.35
lb/ft²
1.49
lb/ft²
1.90
lb/ft²
2.03
lb/ft²
2.30
lb/ft²
2.44
lb/ft²
2.84
lb/ft²
2.98
lb/ft²
3.52
lb/ft²
4.06
lb/ft²
4.47
lb/ft²
Panel Type Panel Thickness in Inches
1/4″ 5/16″ 3/8″ 7/16″ 15/32″ 1/2″ 19/32″ 5/8″ 23/32″ 3/4″ 7/8″ 1″
OSB 0.90
lb/ft²
1.10
lb/ft²
1.20
lb/ft²
1.40
lb/ft²
1.50
lb/ft²
1.70
lb/ft²
2.00
lb/ft²
2.10
lb/ft²
2.40
lb/ft²
2.50
lb/ft²
2.90
lb/ft²
3.30
lb/ft²

Table 2: Plywood Weights in Pounds per Standard Sheet

Weight of Plywood, OSB, and Other Engineered Wood Panels
In Pounds per Standard Sheet (4 feet x 8 feet)
Panel Type Panel Thickness in Inches
1/4″ 11/32″ 3/8″ 15/32″ 1/2″ 19/32″ 5/8″ 23/32″ 3/4″ 7/8″ 1″ 1⅛”
APA Plywood
Standard
26 lb 32 lb 35 lb 45 lb 48 lb 54 lb 58 lb 67 lb 70 lb 83 lb 96 lb 106 lb
Baltic Birch
Plywood
29 lb 37 lb 40 lb 52 lb 55 lb 62 lb 66 lb 77 lb 81 lb 95 lb 110 lb 121 lb
Hardwood
Plywood
26 lb 32 lb 35 lb 45 lb 48 lb 54 lb 58 lb 67 lb 70 lb 83 lb 96 lb 106 lb
Marine
Plywood
27 lb 34 lb 37 lb 48 lb 51 lb 58 lb 61 lb 71 lb 75 lb 89 lb 102 lb 112 lb
Pressure-Treated
Plywood
32 lb 40 lb 44 lb 56 lb 60 lb 68 lb 72 lb 84 lb 88 lb 104 lb 120 lb 132 lb
Softwood
Plywood
23 lb 29 lb 32 lb 40 lb 43 lb 49 lb 52 lb 60 lb 63 lb 75 lb 86 lb 95 lb
MDF 37 lb 46lb 51 lb 64 lb 69 lb 78 lb 83 lb 97 lb 101 lb 120 lb 138 lb 152 lb
MDO 26 lb 32 lb 35 lb 45 lb 48 lb 54 lb 58 lb 67 lb 70 lb 83 lb 96 lb 106 lb
Particle Board 35 lb 43 lb 48 lb 61 lb 65 lb 74 lb 78 lb 91 lb 95 lb 113 lb 130 lb 143 lb
Panel Type Panel Thickness in Inches
1/4″ 5/16″ 3/8″ 7/16″ 15/32″ 1/2″ 19/32″ 5/8″ 23/32″ 3/4″ 7/8″ 1″
OSB 29 lb 35 lb 38 lb 45 lb 48 lb 54 lb 64 lb 67 lb 77 lb 80 lb 93 lb 106 lb

Table 3: Plywood Weights in Kilograms per Square Meter

Weight of Plywood, OSB, and Other Engineered Wood Panels
In Kilograms per Square Meter (kg/m²)
Panel Type Panel Thickness in Millimeters
6 mm 9 mm 12 mm 15 mm 18 mm 21 mm 24 mm 25 mm 28 mm 30 mm
Baltic Birch
Plywood
4.20
kg/m²
5.85
kg/m²
7.80
kg/m²
9.75
kg/m²
11.67
kg/m²
13.65
kg/m²
15.61
kg/m²
16.25
kg/m²
18.20
kg/m²
19.50
kg/m²
Hardwood
Plywood
3.65
kg/m²
5.09
kg/m²
6.78
kg/m²
8.48
kg/m²
10.15
kg/m²
11.87
kg/m²
13.57
kg/m²
14.13
kg/m²
15.83
kg/m²
16.96
kg/m²
Marine
Plywood
3.87
kg/m²
5.40
kg/m²
7.19
kg/m²
8.99
kg/m²
10.76
kg/m²
12.58
kg/m²
14.38
kg/m²
14.98
kg/m²
16.78
kg/m²
17.98
kg/m²
Pressure-Treated
Plywood
4.56
kg/m²
6.36
kg/m²
8.48
kg/m²
10.60
kg/m²
12.69
kg/m²
14.84
kg/m²
16.96
kg/m²
17.66
kg/m²
19.79
kg/m²
21.20
kg/m²
Softwood
Plywood
3.29
kg/m²
4.58
kg/m²
6.10
kg/m²
7.63
kg/m²
9.14
kg/m²
10.68
kg/m²
12.21
kg/m²
12.72
kg/m²
14.25
kg/m²
15.26
kg/m²
MDF 5.26
kg/m²
7.33
kg/m²
9.76
kg/m²
12.21
kg/m²
14.62
kg/m²
17.09
kg/m²
19.54
kg/m²
20.35
kg/m²
22.80
kg/m²
24.42
kg/m²
MDO 3.65
kg/m²
5.09
kg/m²
6.78
kg/m²
8.48
kg/m²
10.15
kg/m²
11.87
kg/m²
13.57
kg/m²
14.13
kg/m²
15.83
kg/m²
16.96
kg/m²
OSB 4.15
kg/m²
5.75
kg/m²
7.66
kg/m²
9.58
kg/m²
11.47
kg/m²
13.41
kg/m²
15.33
kg/m²
15.97
kg/m²
17.89
kg/m²
19.16
kg/m²
Particle Board 4.93
kg/m²
6.87
kg/m²
9.15
kg/m²
11.45
kg/m²
13.70
kg/m²
16.02
kg/m²
18.32
kg/m²
19.08
kg/m²
21.37
kg/m²
22.90
kg/m²

Table 4: Plywood Weights in Kilograms per Standard Sheet

Weight of Plywood, OSB, and Other Engineered Wood Panels
In Kilograms per Standard Sheet (1220 mm x 2440 mm)
Panel Type Panel Thickness in Millimeters
6 mm 9 mm 12 mm 15 mm 18 mm 21 mm 24 mm 25 mm 28 mm 30 mm
Baltic Birch
Plywood
12.50 kg 17.41 kg 23.22 kg 29.02 kg 34.74 kg 40.63 kg 46.47 kg 48.37 kg 54.18 kg 58.05 kg
Hardwood
Plywood
10.87 kg 15.15 kg 20.18 kg 25.24 kg 30.21 kg 35.33 kg 40.40 kg 42.06 kg 47.12 kg 50.49 kg
Marine
Plywood
11.52 kg 16.07 kg 21.40 kg 26.76 kg 32.03 kg 37.45 kg 42.81 kg 44.59 kg 49.95 kg 53.52 kg
Pressure-Treated
Plywood
13.57 kg 18.93 kg 25.24 kg 31.55 kg 37.78 kg 44.18 kg 50.49 kg 52.57 kg 58.91 kg 63.11 kg
Softwood
Plywood
9.79 kg 13.63 kg 18.16 kg 22.71 kg 27.21 kg 31.79 kg 36.35 kg 37.86 kg 42.42 kg 45.43 kg
MDF 15.66 kg 21.82 kg 29.05 kg 36.35 kg 43.52 kg 50.87 kg 58.17 kg 60.58 kg 67.87 kg 72.69 kg
MDO 10.87 kg 15.15 kg 20.18 kg 25.24 kg 30.21 kg 35.33 kg 40.40 kg 42.06 kg 47.12 kg 50.49 kg
OSB 12.35 kg 17.12 kg 22.80 kg 28.52 kg 34.14 kg 39.92 kg 45.63 kg 47.54 kg 53.25 kg 57.04 kg
Particle Board 14.68 kg 20.45 kg 27.24 kg 34.08 kg 40.78 kg 47.69 kg 54.53 kg 56.80 kg 63.61 kg 68.17 kg

Types of Plywood and Other Engineered Wood Panels

APA Standard Plywood Weight

APA Plywood Standard: The Engineered Wood Association (formerly the American Plywood Association) provides standard notional plywood weights for use in determining expected dead loads when performing structural engineering calculations.

Softwood plywood is typically used as structural plywood (roof decking, sheathing, flooring).

The APA Standard plywood weights are not weights for actual products and tend to be somewhat heavier than the weights of any real softwood plywood you will find.

A 4’ x 8’ sheet of 1/2-inch APA Standard Plywood would weigh 48 lbs.

Baltic Birch Plywood Weight

Baltic Birch Plywood Weight
Baltic birch plywood (image courtesy Cherokee Wood Products)

Baltic Birch Plywood: This is a high-quality plywood traditionally produced in Russia and other areas around the Baltic Sea. (Forests around the Baltic Sea can be up to 28% birch trees.)

This type of plywood is made up entirely of birch wood, so unlike some other hardwood plywood, it does not use softwood for the inner plies, and the inner plies are void-free, increasing its stability. Baltic birch plywood is used mostly for furniture-making and cabinetry.

A typical 4’ x 8’ sheet of 1/2-inch Baltic Birch Plywood weighs around 55 lbs.

See Baltic Birch Plywood at the Home Depot.

Hardwood Plywood Weight

Hardwood Plywood
Hardwood plywood (image courtesy Saroyan Hardwoods)

Hardwood Plywood: At least the front and back veneers (outer plies) of hardwood plywood will be made of a hardwood species such as maple or oak.

Although the inner plies may also be hardwood, more often they will be made of a cheaper softwood species. The hardwood veneers improve strength, stability, and impact-resistance.

Hardwood plywood is commonly used in applications where these qualities are desired, like flooring, cabinets, or wall paneling.

A typical 4’ x 8’ sheet of 1/2-inch Hardwood Plywood weighs around 48 lbs.

See Hardwood Plywood at the Home Depot.

Marine Plywood Weight

Marine Plywood
Marine plywood

Marine Plywood: Despite its name, this is not a waterproof plywood. Marine plywood is manufactured using specially formulated water-resistant adhesive and very dense, high-quality outer plies. These high-quality outer veneers serve to help prevent moisture from penetrating the panel.

Marine plywood is designed to be used where the material will be subjected to higher-than-normal amounts of moisture, such as marinas and other coastal environments.

A typical 4’ x 8’ sheet of 1/2-inch Marine Plywood weighs around 51 lbs.

Pressure-Treated Plywood Weight

Pressure-Treated Plywood
Pressure-treated plywood

Pressure-Treated Plywood: This is usually a softwood plywood that has been pressure-treated to help it resist decay caused by fungus, insects, and other organisms.

Southern yellow pine is particularly well-suited for pressure treating, and most pressure-treated plywood is made from southern yellow pine. Special waterproof adhesives are used when this plywood is manufactured so it can withstand the pressure-treating process without falling apart.

Pressure-treated plywood uses relatively more adhesive than other plywoods. Because of this and the fact that the southern yellow pine used is much heavier than other wood species used in construction, pressure-treated plywood tends to be a heavy plywood.

Pressure-treated plywood is heavier than other plywoods even after drying out from the pressure-treating process. Before drying out, of course, it can be much, much heavier.

A typical 4’ x 8’ sheet of 1/2-inch Pressure-Treated Plywood weighs around 60 lbs.

See Pressure-Treated Plywood at the Home Depot.

Softwood Plywood Weight

CDX Softwood Plywood
CDX softwood plywood (image courtesy Mick George Group)

Softwood Plywood: This is the type of plywood most commonly used in construction.

When people talk about structural plywood, it’s almost always softwood plywood that they’re talking about. Softwood plywood is used for roof sheathing, wall sheathing, subfloors, and more.

Softwood plywood comes from coniferous trees, primarily fir, pine, or spruce. It is generally the lightest type of engineered wood panel, due to the light weight of the wood species used and the (relatively) low amount of adhesive used in the manufacturing process. Softwood plywood weight is further reduced by the presence of unfilled voids within the inner plies.

Softwood plywood is normally the cheapest plywood. CDX plywood, the most common plywood used for roof sheathing, is a grade of softwood plywood.

A typical 4’ x 8’ sheet of 1/2-inch Softwood Plywood weighs around 43 lbs.

See Softwood Plywood at the Home Depot.

MDF Weight

MDF Panels
⅛” MDF panels (image courtesy Amazon)

MDF: Medium Density Fiberboard is produced from wood scraps left over from other wood product manufacturing activities.

This waste wood can be either hardwood or softwood. The scraps are broken down into very small wood fibers, which are combined with wax and adhesive resin to form the MDF panels.

MDF does not handle moisture well, and is normally only used for interior applications, such as flooring or furniture.

Because of the extremely high resin content, MDF tends to be one of the heaviest types of engineered wood panels.

A typical 4’ x 8’ sheet of 1/2-inch MDF weighs around 69 lbs.

See MDF on Amazon.

See MDF at the Home Depot.

MDO Weight

MDO Panels
MDO panels (image courtesy Capitol City Lumber)

MDO: Medium Density Overlay is a type of exterior plywood specifically designed to be painted easily. The use of MDO for sign boards is very common. Due to its extremely smooth surface, it holds paint better, and looks better after being painted, than other types of engineered wood panels.

The wood plies in MDO panels are typically softwood, and a thick, smooth layer (the overlay) of a highly water-resistant resin is applied to either one or both sides of the panel.

A typical 4’ x 8’ sheet of 1/2-inch MDO weighs around 48 lbs.

Particle Board Weight

Particle Board
Particle board (image courtesy Plywood Company of Fort Worth)

Particle Board: The product generally known as “particle board” is similar to MDF.

It is made with similar manufacturing techniques, but the end product is cheaper, weaker, and of lower density. It is also called LDF (low density fiberboard).

A typical 4’ x 8’ sheet of 1/2-inch Particle Board weighs around 66 lbs.

OSB Weight

OSB Panels
OSB panels (image courtesy Hobatex Industrial Partners)

OSB: Oriented Strand Board is plywood’s biggest competitor as a structural wood panel in North America.

In large-scale commercial construction, OSB has largely replaced softwood plywood in wall sheathing, roof sheathing, and subflooring applications. This, of course, is due to the fact that a sheet of OSB costs about 20% less than the equivalent sheet of plywood.

OSB is made by breaking down wood into small strips, or “strands”, up to 6 inches long, combining these strands with wax and adhesive resin under pressure and heat to form layers.

The strands in each layer are all generally “oriented” in the same direction. These layers are combined to form OSB panels of the desired panel thickness.

The wood strands in the outer layers are oriented one way, and the strands in the interior layers are oriented the other way, which increases panel strength.

OSB is manufactured in a slightly different range of thicknesses than plywood.

A typical 4′ x 8′ sheet of 1/2-inch OSB weighs around 54 lbs.

See OSB at the Home Depot.

Ask the Lumber Company!

Remember, the values for plywood weight, OSB weight, etc. given in our weight tables are meant to provide a general idea of typical engineered wood panel weights, and should not be used if precise values are needed for critical engineering calculations.

When precision is necessary, always refer to the specification sheet for the actual, specific product you intend to use, or contact the technical department of the panel manufacturer.

Most lumber yards or plywood manufacturers will list a phone number for their technical department on the contact page on their website. Go ahead and call it if you have any questions!


About the Author

Jack Gray is a principal roof consultant and vice president at the Moriarty Corporation, an award-winning building enclosure consultant firm founded in 1967. He is also the editor of the Roof Online website.

He has worked in the roofing industry for nearly 25 years, with training and practical experience in roof safety, roof inspection, roof condition assessment, estimating, roof design & specification, roof installation, quality assurance, roof maintenance & repair, and roof asset management.

He was awarded the Registered Roof Observer (RRO) professional credential in 2009.

He also served as an infantry paratrooper in the 82nd Airborne Division and attended Cornell University. Read full bio.